You Could Be The One


I seldom post a song, let alone a video clip. But this song has been in my head since I don’t know when, and I love this arrangement with all the strings and everything…

Nobody wants to be alone
The heart beats happy when it has a place
And if it doesn’t have a home
It can come into my space

So you can be the one I love
I can be the one you long for
You can be the one I want… want
And you can be the one I love
This could be our world wide open
You can be the one I want… want

When you’ve fallen for someone
But that someone doesn’t feel the same
But before you come undone
You can call out my name

So you can be the one I love
I can be the one you long for
You can be the one I want… want
And you can be the one I love
This could be our world wide open
You can be the one I want… want

So you can be the one… one one one
I can be the one… one one one
So you can be the one… one one one
I can be the one… one one one

So you can be the one I love
I can be the one you long for
You can be the one I want… want
And you can be the one I love
This could be our world wide open
You can be the one I want… want

I miss my headphones…

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The Pursuit of Perfection


Perfection is an elusive goal. In some cases, it is practically impossible to achieve perfection. Take a simple example: finding a perfect boarding house. Now, this is a true story, my story.

When I first came to Bali, a new friend of mine took me to see a potential boarding house. I immediately took it, not because it’s perfect, but because it’s logical. I’m a new guy, I have to find a place to live, pronto. As it turns out, it was a great boarding house. The owners (and their kids) were all smiles and happy to welcome me, neighbors minded their own business and for the most part didn’t cause any trouble, the cost is affordable, and the room’s got quite some space. I got used to the dogs barking their heads off in the middle of the night. But later on, after the owner’s mom got sick — mind you, she’s a 98-year-old grandma with a case of a never-healing-broken-arm — things got a bit complicated.

How would you like to wake up hearing a very old lady moaning and calling out someone’s name, while trying to scrape pieces of plastic off of her broken arm, plus the family’s helper dragging an empty bucket just outside your front door? Add to that the setting: 2 a.m., in the middle of a thunderstorm and a soundtrack of dogs whimpering, while the smell of burnt incense from the day’s evening prayers hasn’t gone away.

I do not want to be there when she passes away. (not that I want her to, but you know… it’s frickin’ eerie!)

I was lucky enough that a friend offered me a vacant room at her boarding house, one that I’ve had my eyes on since a few months back. So I immediately took the opportunity. I was delighted. The room was bigger and had better flooring and walls, air circulation was much better, and best of all I had no worries about midnight wake-up calls from any dogs. Oh, and of course I was excited to finally have neighbors that I actually know. Little did I know…

I got me lots of new neighbors. But this one right next door… oh man… I still wake up at 2 a.m. sometimes, not because of dogs barking or old ladies moaning, but because of the fights they have. She’d yell and scream and cry at the same time and he’d just rub it in her face. And then she’d hurl a cellphone to my wall and it breaks to pieces. And the words… oh, the words just couldn’t get any harsher.

I could handle the noises just fine, I just thought of them as wild dogs barking their heads off and biting each other. But the harsh words, they get me tense every time. There were times when I really wanted to come out with my broom and just knock her out (and then deal with her boyfriend).

But she’s the owner’s niece. I strike her and I’m out.

So there you have it. The pursuit of a perfect place to live. I’m not talking about a huge palace with a swimming pool and jacuzzi (although it wouldn’t hurt if I could afford such a place), but a place where I can just live peacefully in a community where everybody has good manners and are thoughtful enough to minimize disturbance to everybody else.

Quite impossible, it seems.

UPDATE: It turns out that as I was writing this post, the now 99-year-old lady really passed away. My sincere condolences for the kind family that looked after me for that wonderful year.


The Personality of The Interwebs


A good portion of the computer-literate world is now accustomed to publishing personal articles on the interwebs. Heck, even my mom now has a facebook account. But not everybody is prepared to consume all the information the web can provide us today.

Exhibit #1: Many people publicly post their most personal thoughts or feelings or emotions. I realize that not all blog-writers or facebook dwellers or tweeps are fully aware of the privacy preferences provided by the sites they use, but that’s not the point. It’s the content of what they are publishing that matters.

Exhibit #2: Many people are disturbed or annoyed one way or another by other people publishing their most personal thoughts or feelings, political stances, or even just putting up a simple personal opinion online. How Apple fanboys who think Steve Jobs is the next Jesus debates with PC fanboys who think Jobs is a nutcase is a prime example of this. Also, the not-so-recent launch of “Draw Mohammad” day on facebook obviously got the world debating furiously over the appropriateness of it as a way to encourage people to exercise their right to free speech.

So there you have it. Some people post away without thinking of the consequences. Some other people are disturbed by what somebody publishes because it just tickles their nerves.

Some people do both.

Why criticize people who post their affection for their God when you post away how your affection for a human makes you feel the world is a really ugly place to live in?

My idea: If you can’t say something nice, or if you can’t rephrase your not-so-nice opinion into something civil, or if you can’t evaluate the repercussions of what you are about to say… just keep your mouth shut. And if you choose to speak anyway, don’t cover your ears while somebody else says roughly the same thing to you about something slightly different.


Testing 1 2 3…


yak ini adalah percobaan posting di wordpress setelah sekian lama tidak menulis lagi akibat tidak punya koneksi sehingga bingung mau ngeblog dari mana dan pada akhirnya jadi malas menulis…

fiuh…


Still…


I knew waiting was going to be hell, but I didn’t expect hell to be so cold and quiet…

Hello??

Anybody here?

Huff…


Krik Krik Krik…


Sunday morning. Message sent…

5 minutes…

10 minutes…

30 minutes…

1 hour…

3 hours…

No reply. Krik krik krik…

 

Sunday evening. Message sent…

3 hours…

6 hours…

The next morning…

No reply. Krik krik krik…

 

Was it something I said?? Krik krik krik…

Now I gotta get back to work…

Gyaaahhhh….


Making Your Voice Heard Without Violence


Today I ran into this great video about how Unilever’s Dove product line’s use of palm oil affects the whole world. It is not about the palm oil itself, but about how it is taken from the greener parts of Indonesia. The video states that 98% of the rainforests in Indonesia will be gone within 20 or so years. Apparently this video has rounded up support from around the world to make the company agree to make amends (see here). What interests me though, is how the video itself is closed with the sentence: “Talk to Dove before it’s too late”. It turns out that this video is a direct response to Dove’s Onslaught video, depicting how the beauty industry is significantly affecting the minds of young girls. The final quote is essentially the same: “Talk to your daughter before the beauty industry does”.

I think this is a very good way of making your voice heard – and recognized – without the need of violence. Instead of encouraging people to stop using Dove products altogether (or worse, rally them up in front of Unilever’s gates to destroy the plant, which is quite common practice in Indonesia), they urged people to talk and send emails, letters, and whatever it is people can come up with, to Unilever. The result, as you can see, is much better. No violence, no harm done, and the message gets through and transforms into actions. How effective this message affects the company and thus solves the problem is yet to be seen, but this is already one big step.

This is a critic against FPI, who earlier this month abuses their superior physical strength to enforce their beliefs on a weaker mass. Why not use smarter and more civilized ways, thus avoiding altogether the silly and emotional debates that have surfaced for the past few weeks. At least from my point of view, beating up women and potentially harming children in the process is not a good way to exhibit one’s righteousness. Gathering people to bite each other’s heads off on national television is also a waste of time.

Being emotional is good, as it often happens when people are passionate about things and go all-out on it. But it turns bad when the emotion is targeted to other people who may not share the same beliefs, or worse, who may not know anything at all about the cause. Greenpeace’s video is a very good example of how a passionate group of people can make their voice heard without resorting to forceful actions that ultimately ends up in violence.

Come on, FPI, you’ve got a lot to learn before you can prove your righteousness.